AAU Junior Olympic Games 2017

Ypsilanti, MI

Coverage

Sabree Brooks demolishes 10yo 100m AAU record Jul 31, 2017

There are certain time barriers in track and field that distinguish the truly remarkable athletes, and serve as time-honored measuring sticks for progress. One of those is the 13-second barrier for a female 100m runner. Sixteen years ago, Bijon Robinson of California set the AAU national championships 10-year-old girls record for 100m at 12.93, an especially outstanding time given her age. Not until today in Ypsilanti, Michigan, at the 2017 AAU Junior Olympic Games could someone crack the time. But Sabree Brooks of Indiana didn't just crack it -- she demolished it, clocking 12.76 to set a new standard for 10-year-old girls in track and field's shortest sprint.SaBree Brooks just broke the AAU National Record for the 10-year-old girls running 12.76!! #AAUJROGames pic.twitter.com/hLgXGeJLA6— MileSplit US (@milesplit) July 31, 2017 "I ran my race and I kept my pace," she said after the prelim win. "I did drive phase for 15 meters and then put my head up."Brooks, who hails from Indianapolis, owned a previous personal best of 13.3. She represented Athletes Lives Network Sports with a red singlet and said in a post-race interview that her favorite colors include red, hot pink, gold, and silver. She ate oatmeal for breakfast this morning.Brooks has competed in track and field since she was seven years old. Later this week, she will contest the 400m and 200m, where she said she hopes to run "a 1:01 or 59 seconds flat, and in the 200m, I want to run a 27 flat or 25 flat."Brooks has another Robinson record to aim for in the 200m; she also set the AAU national championships record in that event in 2001 with a 26.36 effort.The 400m record is just a year old, as Kanai Bey-English of Pennsylvania ran 59.51 last year.

Cha'iel 'Mocha' Johnson Wants To Break Raevyn Rogers' Record Aug 02, 2017

By Cory Mull, Milesplit___Cha'iel Johnson had one thing on her mind with 200 meters to go. "I knew I was in trouble," she said. "I had to go." And off the Miami Gardens Xpress Track Club 12-year-old athlete went, pushing toward a new personal record time of 2:13.72 in the 800m at the AAU Junior Olympic Championships in Ypsilanti, Michigan. It was her third straight championship -- she won the 400m in 2015 and the 800m in 2016. She was just 0.43 seconds away from a setting a new AAU national record in the race. "In my mind I was going for the record," she said. "I had to fight hard, finish hard and get out."The race wasn't in the bag, however, until Johnson shifted into a final gear in the last 200m as one final surge came from Serenity Brazell, of Tampa, Florida."I have a lot of heart," Johnson said. "I do my races with my heart. I just know I can win it and stuff like that. I do it for my parents, my coaches, my sisters and my brothers and my whole team."Johnson ultimately bested her previous best of 2:14.80, which she set at the AAU National Club Championships from July 9-15 in Florida. But the 12-year-old said she was motivated from the start. She said her father, NFL alum Chad Johnson, offered encouragement from the gun. "He was like, 'Hey Mo!'" she said. Her coach, Darius Lawshea, told her "to pull the trigger," Johnson said, "which means go hard and fight hard." Ultimately, it was one of the best days of Johnson's still growing athletic career. "Biggest day and biggest race of my life," she said. Afterward, Johnson kept dreaming big. "I'm running college times," she said. "I'm faster than some of the college girls. I'm trying to go after Raeyvn Rogers' record and Daesha Rogers." Next up? Daesha Rogers' 13-year-old record of 2:07.65.  Related Links: Chaiel Johnson Athlete ProfileChad Johnson talks about his daughterCha'iel Johnson living up to the hypeDaughter of NFL Great Forging New Path

Friday Focus Q&A With Hope Igbinoghene Jul 07, 2017

We caught up with Hope Igbinoghene in this week's Friday Focus to see what she had to say about her high school track season, her performance last weekend and her goals for the AAU Junior Olympics.