UIL Rule after 2/5?
01/26/2011 8:35:13 PM
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Question for you guys...is there a UIL rule that after 2/5, your track athlete must train with his/her high school coach and is not allowed to be coached by a club coach? If the track athlete wants to run track for their high school track team, that is. Thanks for any help regarding this matter.
Question for you guys...is there a UIL rule that after 2/5, your track athlete must train with his/her high school coach and is not allowed to be coached by a club coach? If the track athlete wants to run track for their high school track team, that is.
Thanks for any help regarding this matter.
01/26/2011 9:37:51 PM
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I've never heard of a rule like that, but the wording of your question is fascinating. If you want to avoid training with your dumb-as-rocks HS coach in favor of your totally awesome club coach, I suggest you have the club coach take you/your kid to TAPPS, SPC, or college meets and just run for the club. Your post seems to imply that the ideal situation would be for you/your kid to be trained by the club coach and driven to the meets by the high school coach. They can pick up the entry fee, too. If I were the coach, I wouldn't go for this situation, either. I think you should just be upfront with the HS coach and tell him that you want him to be you/your kids busdriver. Maybe he will be OK with it.
I've never heard of a rule like that, but the wording of your question is fascinating. If you want to avoid training with your dumb-as-rocks HS coach in favor of your totally awesome club coach, I suggest you have the club coach take you/your kid to TAPPS, SPC, or college meets and just run for the club.

Your post seems to imply that the ideal situation would be for you/your kid to be trained by the club coach and driven to the meets by the high school coach. They can pick up the entry fee, too.

If I were the coach, I wouldn't go for this situation, either.

I think you should just be upfront with the HS coach and tell him that you want him to be you/your kids busdriver. Maybe he will be OK with it.
01/27/2011 2:46:35 PM
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That's an awfully negative view. I don't know this person but maybe it isn't a case of amazing club coach and dumb high school coach. My daughter would love to train with a local club so there would be some girls who are as fast or faster than her to push her in training. That's something that she's never had in school. We asked the athletic director to let her miss practice one afternoon a week so that she wouldn't be on her third workout of the day if she went to a club practice in the evening. We were told that her best interests are irrelevant and all a track athlete needs to train is a stop watch. I'm not a coach, so I'm not sure why it would be such a problem for different coaches to cooperate for the good of a student/athlete. Maybe there's more to this than ego, but I'm not so sure.
That's an awfully negative view. I don't know this person but maybe it isn't a case of amazing club coach and dumb high school coach. My daughter would love to train with a local club so there would be some girls who are as fast or faster than her to push her in training. That's something that she's never had in school. We asked the athletic director to let her miss practice one afternoon a week so that she wouldn't be on her third workout of the day if she went to a club practice in the evening. We were told that her best interests are irrelevant and all a track athlete needs to train is a stop watch. I'm not a coach, so I'm not sure why it would be such a problem for different coaches to cooperate for the good of a student/athlete. Maybe there's more to this than ego, but I'm not so sure.
01/27/2011 3:12:42 PM
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Thanks for your replies. I really just wanted to know if there is a rule that exists, as this is what we are being told. I don't have a problem with our hs track coach, just would like truthfulness.
Thanks for your replies. I really just wanted to know if there is a rule that exists, as this is what we are being told. I don't have a problem with our hs track coach, just would like truthfulness.
01/27/2011 6:27:13 PM
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@gleish11 That is exactly the stuff that I'm talking about. You want your daughter excused from a school practice for the school team so she can do her own thing while all the other girls attend. What kind of questions do you think that prompts from the other girls? What if they, too, want to go train? Does the coach just kind of let everyone off on Wednesday? You don't get it because you are thinking about one person instead of a TEAM. That is fine, but if you want to be on the track team, you need to fulfill the requirements of the track team. This is one of the reasons a coach should never have a club athlete as the bell cow. It is all about them and the team can't follow that lead.
@gleish11 That is exactly the stuff that I'm talking about. You want your daughter excused from a school practice for the school team so she can do her own thing while all the other girls attend. What kind of questions do you think that prompts from the other girls? What if they, too, want to go train? Does the coach just kind of let everyone off on Wednesday?

You don't get it because you are thinking about one person instead of a TEAM. That is fine, but if you want to be on the track team, you need to fulfill the requirements of the track team.

This is one of the reasons a coach should never have a club athlete as the bell cow. It is all about them and the team can't follow that lead.
01/27/2011 8:08:40 PM
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@Aggietom You're right. I am thinking about one person and not the team, which I suppose is why parents don't make fabulous coaches. In my case, another reason would be that I don't know squat about running. I was just saying that wanting to go to a club practice doesn't necessarily mean that you disrespect your coach or don't want to be a team player. Of course none of this answers the question posed in the thread and I'm certainly no credible source on UIL rules, so I'll stop posting now. Hope you have a nice night and a successful season.
@Aggietom You're right. I am thinking about one person and not the team, which I suppose is why parents don't make fabulous coaches. In my case, another reason would be that I don't know squat about running. I was just saying that wanting to go to a club practice doesn't necessarily mean that you disrespect your coach or don't want to be a team player. Of course none of this answers the question posed in the thread and I'm certainly no credible source on UIL rules, so I'll stop posting now. Hope you have a nice night and a successful season.
01/27/2011 8:09:57 PM
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Tom is right...there's no official UIL rule that says that you must only train with your HS after Fed 2nd. Most likely, it's some school's team rule (and a reasonable one at that) that a particular HS coach requests of his/her team. Many HS's "officially" start track February 1st, and most HS coaches want their athletes to train with their HS track team alone. A team commitment kinda thing...right? Make sense to me. The only UIL rule that I know of pertaining to coaching track is that all athletes at a UIL school affiliated track meet must be coached (or represented) by a coach from that athlete's HS....i.e....a club coach can't be on the field giving instructions and coaching athletes at a HS meet. The only exception that I've seen UIL turn a blind eye to this is pole vault. PV is such a technical (and potentially dangerous) event that I've seen many a club coach around during HS competition.
Tom is right...there's no official UIL rule that says that you must only train with your HS after Fed 2nd. Most likely, it's some school's team rule (and a reasonable one at that) that a particular HS coach requests of his/her team. Many HS's "officially" start track February 1st, and most HS coaches want their athletes to train with their HS track team alone. A team commitment kinda thing...right? Make sense to me.

The only UIL rule that I know of pertaining to coaching track is that all athletes at a UIL school affiliated track meet must be coached (or represented) by a coach from that athlete's HS....i.e....a club coach can't be on the field giving instructions and coaching athletes at a HS meet. The only exception that I've seen UIL turn a blind eye to this is pole vault. PV is such a technical (and potentially dangerous) event that I've seen many a club coach around during HS competition.
01/27/2011 8:34:48 PM
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Don't take it personally. I've seen some crazy stuff happen when the club coach shows up at district and wants to coach the athlete while the HS coach is giving instructions. Who do they listen to? It is almost always the one they pay for - whether or not that person has a clue or not. I'm sure there are some good club coaches...but go to the indoor meets and hang around. The atmosphere is a recruiting warfare and there is definitely a dirty side to it that is a complete turnoff to me. I can admit I am sour to the whole thing.
Don't take it personally. I've seen some crazy stuff happen when the club coach shows up at district and wants to coach the athlete while the HS coach is giving instructions.

Who do they listen to? It is almost always the one they pay for - whether or not that person has a clue or not.

I'm sure there are some good club coaches...but go to the indoor meets and hang around. The atmosphere is a recruiting warfare and there is definitely a dirty side to it that is a complete turnoff to me. I can admit I am sour to the whole thing.
01/27/2011 9:27:45 PM
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Oh...I hear ya. For HS's to allow club track coaches on the field is unacceptable. I'm sure the Houston club scene is insane compared to Austin. We all know club track is very hit or miss in terms of quality of training and coaching...just like HS track. For the most part, I try to promote summer track with my sprinters as long as they are taking a good 3-4 week break after spring UIL track (esp. for girls). If the quality of training is good, then I absolutely have no qualms with club track at all as long as the kids are communicating with me and doing what they are supposed to be doing. As for indoor track, it's the same. As long as kids are being properly trained and not being thrown into insanely hard (and stupid) workouts, then I've got no problems with Nov, Dec, early Jan. club training and a couple of indoor meets for sprinters.
Oh...I hear ya. For HS's to allow club track coaches on the field is unacceptable. I'm sure the Houston club scene is insane compared to Austin.

We all know club track is very hit or miss in terms of quality of training and coaching...just like HS track. For the most part, I try to promote summer track with my sprinters as long as they are taking a good 3-4 week break after spring UIL track (esp. for girls). If the quality of training is good, then I absolutely have no qualms with club track at all as long as the kids are communicating with me and doing what they are supposed to be doing.

As for indoor track, it's the same. As long as kids are being properly trained and not being thrown into insanely hard (and stupid) workouts, then I've got no problems with Nov, Dec, early Jan. club training and a couple of indoor meets for sprinters.
01/28/2011 2:40:49 PM
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@horn1chris Coach, Though I hate all the vitriol concerning club coaches v school coaches, I can say that I and Coach Bragner have always had a good relationship with you, Coach Roberts, and really any high school coach. We do not try to interfere with any athlete during their school season other than critiquing them if asked. What we have to always keep sight of is that there are good and bad on both sides. Just as there are many bad club coaches, there are bad school coaches and the loser in both cases is the child. Coach Bragner and I have always and will continue to communicate with you and other coaches as we work to help these kids get an education by using their brains and athletic ability.
@horn1chris

Coach,

Though I hate all the vitriol concerning club coaches v school coaches, I can say that I and Coach Bragner have always had a good relationship with you, Coach Roberts, and really any high school coach. We do not try to interfere with any athlete during their school season other than critiquing them if asked. What we have to always keep sight of is that there are good and bad on both sides. Just as there are many bad club coaches, there are bad school coaches and the loser in both cases is the child. Coach Bragner and I have always and will continue to communicate with you and other coaches as we work to help these kids get an education by using their brains and athletic ability.
01/28/2011 5:03:03 PM
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@Coach_H I agree...XtremeForce is certainly one of the best in Central Texas. The fact that your team actually employs a sound training philosphy behind your workouts is impressive. I certainly can't say that for everybody in our area. You and Coach B have helped out ALOT of kids that needed help in more ways that one. Your efforts haven't gone unnoticed...thanks for all you do to help the local track scene!
@Coach_H

I agree...XtremeForce is certainly one of the best in Central Texas. The fact that your team actually employs a sound training philosphy behind your workouts is impressive. I certainly can't say that for everybody in our area. You and Coach B have helped out ALOT of kids that needed help in more ways that one. Your efforts haven't gone unnoticed...thanks for all you do to help the local track scene!
01/29/2011 2:24:11 AM
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I think one of the problems with someone trying to please two coaches is that there is no consistency in the training. A successful training program is not made up of "good workouts." It's a philosophy that is followed day after day. It's a plan that starts as soon as one season is done and is carried out until the completion of the next season. I've seen too many club "coaches" that will tell kids to come do this one "magic workout" with them each week as if that will make all the difference. Most of the time, that type of coach is looking after his own wallet or his own ego.
I think one of the problems with someone trying to please two coaches is that there is no consistency in the training. A successful training program is not made up of "good workouts." It's a philosophy that is followed day after day. It's a plan that starts as soon as one season is done and is carried out until the completion of the next season.

I've seen too many club "coaches" that will tell kids to come do this one "magic workout" with them each week as if that will make all the difference. Most of the time, that type of coach is looking after his own wallet or his own ego.
01/29/2011 10:24:05 AM
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SFAMiler and I have had similar experiences. I remember last year when a hurdle coach was going to practices around our area and recruiting kids DURING the practice. That is totally wild. The same guy also sits in the stands at meets and goes up to the winners of the 100 and 300 hurdles and tells them he can help them become elite. If this was just one guy, I wouldn't be concerned. But our area is over run with these types. One of my sprinters worked with a private coach on the weekends and when she picked a summer club to run with (he didn't have one), he dropped her because he "didn't want them getting all the credit." I was floored when I heard that. The thing that really gets me is this - the workouts are almost always on Sunday. In the offseason, this leaves them dead for any "Big Monday" workout. Since low-performing runners rarely go seek outside help, the tired ones are usually the ones who need to lead by example and they are unable to do it. It affects the team through a trickle down process. If the good ones bail, then the others think they should to...after all, they aren't as fast as the ones who quit. The Sunday workout is even worse during the season. The meets are on Saturday and they chase it with a hard workout. It makes sense to go hard on Saturday/Monday or Saturday/Tuesday, but not S/S/M or S/S/T. Sunday is needed for recovery. The Austin track scene might not be like this, but I know Houston is. And not every private coach is bad. I get that and I even talk to one of them semi-frequently. I just have not had a lot of positive experiences with them, nor have any HS coaches that I know. It seems like the programs where it doesn't seem to be a problem are the programs where the head coach is just chillin' and looking to outsource some of the work. In other words, they don't really feel like they need to do any of the coaching as long as they get the kids to the meet.
SFAMiler and I have had similar experiences. I remember last year when a hurdle coach was going to practices around our area and recruiting kids DURING the practice. That is totally wild.

The same guy also sits in the stands at meets and goes up to the winners of the 100 and 300 hurdles and tells them he can help them become elite.

If this was just one guy, I wouldn't be concerned. But our area is over run with these types. One of my sprinters worked with a private coach on the weekends and when she picked a summer club to run with (he didn't have one), he dropped her because he "didn't want them getting all the credit."

I was floored when I heard that.

The thing that really gets me is this - the workouts are almost always on Sunday. In the offseason, this leaves them dead for any "Big Monday" workout. Since low-performing runners rarely go seek outside help, the tired ones are usually the ones who need to lead by example and they are unable to do it. It affects the team through a trickle down process. If the good ones bail, then the others think they should to...after all, they aren't as fast as the ones who quit.

The Sunday workout is even worse during the season. The meets are on Saturday and they chase it with a hard workout. It makes sense to go hard on Saturday/Monday or Saturday/Tuesday, but not S/S/M or S/S/T. Sunday is needed for recovery.

The Austin track scene might not be like this, but I know Houston is. And not every private coach is bad. I get that and I even talk to one of them semi-frequently. I just have not had a lot of positive experiences with them, nor have any HS coaches that I know. It seems like the programs where it doesn't seem to be a problem are the programs where the head coach is just chillin' and looking to outsource some of the work. In other words, they don't really feel like they need to do any of the coaching as long as they get the kids to the meet.
01/30/2011 6:21:01 PM
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@Aggietom Aggietom, if we had all good HS coaches the girls would be running a 5k in XC!!!
@Aggietom

Aggietom, if we had all good HS coaches the girls would be running a 5k in XC!!!
01/30/2011 7:11:06 PM
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[quote=rchavez]@Aggietom Aggietom, if we had all good HS coaches the girls would be running a 5k in XC!!![/quote] @rchavez I've learned first-hand that this isn't really what that issue is about. For example, there is a 5A majority among coaches, athletes, and superintendents, yet nothing is happening. Think about why for a second.
rchavez wrote:
@Aggietom

Aggietom, if we had all good HS coaches the girls would be running a 5k in XC!!!


@rchavez I've learned first-hand that this isn't really what that issue is about. For example, there is a 5A majority among coaches, athletes, and superintendents, yet nothing is happening. Think about why for a second.
01/30/2011 11:04:16 PM
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@Aggietom If a parent pays to send their kids to Sylvan Learning Center or Kumon for academic training with no negative feedback from the administration, then they should be able to pay for any additional training they desire in track and field much like what happens in gymnastic, swimming and cheer-leading camps, along with the major efforts in baseball personal training that is encourage and is outside of the high school program. I do not see why track coaches have bigger egos than their golf, tennis, cheer-leading or baseball and wrestling coaches have. Oh I'm sorry some of them or acting as those coaches too along with track coaches. Sometimes HS coaches are spread pretty thin with multiple sport coaching requirements. However, no one mandates HS coaches to have track and field instructor certifications which the club coaches are required, many with Level II specialties and some of them work as track officials at UIL regional and state meets with these credentials. I would love to see more efforts around HS coaches getting involved with college recruiting which club coaches are highly effective in this area but get no credit for their efforts.
@Aggietom

If a parent pays to send their kids to Sylvan Learning Center or Kumon for academic training with no negative feedback from the administration, then they should be able to pay for any additional training they desire in track and field much like what happens in gymnastic, swimming and cheer-leading camps, along with the major efforts in baseball personal training that is encourage and is outside of the high school program. I do not see why track coaches have bigger egos than their golf, tennis, cheer-leading or baseball and wrestling coaches have. Oh I'm sorry some of them or acting as those coaches too along with track coaches.

Sometimes HS coaches are spread pretty thin with multiple sport coaching requirements. However, no one mandates HS coaches to have track and field instructor certifications which the club coaches are required, many with Level II specialties and some of them work as track officials at UIL regional and state meets with these credentials.

I would love to see more efforts around HS coaches getting involved with college recruiting which club coaches are highly effective in this area but get no credit for their efforts.
01/30/2011 11:35:32 PM
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This guy you are making fun of has a proven record in hurdling expertise and all of his athletes are nationally ranked, some are in college now. Be careful belittling someone when one your athletes maybe getting his/her hurdling fundamentals from him and you maybe the bus driver, who pats yourself on the back for someone else efforts. Some of these kids came into the middle school already hurdling and jumping! So where did they get there fundamentals? There are only three high school training programs that are open to area athletes during off season, St. Johns, The Woodlands and Cinco Ranch and they are not free. [quote=Aggietom]SFAMiler and I have had similar experiences. I remember last year when a hurdle coach was going to practices around our area and recruiting kids DURING the practice. That is totally wild. The same guy also sits in the stands at meets and goes up to the winners of the 100 and 300 hurdles and tells them he can help them become elite. If this was just one guy, I wouldn't be concerned. But our area is over run with these types. One of my sprinters worked with a private coach on the weekends and when she picked a summer club to run with (he didn't have one), he dropped her because he "didn't want them getting all the credit." I was floored when I heard that. The thing that really gets me is this - the workouts are almost always on Sunday. In the offseason, this leaves them dead for any "Big Monday" workout. Since low-performing runners rarely go seek outside help, the tired ones are usually the ones who need to lead by example and they are unable to do it. It affects the team through a trickle down process. If the good ones bail, then the others think they should to...after all, they aren't as fast as the ones who quit. The Sunday workout is even worse during the season. The meets are on Saturday and they chase it with a hard workout. It makes sense to go hard on Saturday/Monday or Saturday/Tuesday, but not S/S/M or S/S/T. Sunday is needed for recovery. The Austin track scene might not be like this, but I know Houston is. And not every private coach is bad. I get that and I even talk to one of them semi-frequently. I just have not had a lot of positive experiences with them, nor have any HS coaches that I know. It seems like the programs where it doesn't seem to be a problem are the programs where the head coach is just chillin' and looking to outsource some of the work. In other words, they don't really feel like they need to do any of the coaching as long as they get the kids to the meet.[/quote] @Aggietom
This guy you are making fun of has a proven record in hurdling expertise and all of his athletes are nationally ranked, some are in college now. Be careful belittling someone when one your athletes maybe getting his/her hurdling fundamentals from him and you maybe the bus driver, who pats yourself on the back for someone else efforts. Some of these kids came into the middle school already hurdling and jumping! So where did they get there fundamentals? There are only three high school training programs that are open to area athletes during off season, St. Johns, The Woodlands and Cinco Ranch and they are not free.

Aggietom wrote:
SFAMiler and I have had similar experiences. I remember last year when a hurdle coach was going to practices around our area and recruiting kids DURING the practice. That is totally wild.

The same guy also sits in the stands at meets and goes up to the winners of the 100 and 300 hurdles and tells them he can help them become elite.

If this was just one guy, I wouldn't be concerned. But our area is over run with these types. One of my sprinters worked with a private coach on the weekends and when she picked a summer club to run with (he didn't have one), he dropped her because he "didn't want them getting all the credit."

I was floored when I heard that.

The thing that really gets me is this - the workouts are almost always on Sunday. In the offseason, this leaves them dead for any "Big Monday" workout. Since low-performing runners rarely go seek outside help, the tired ones are usually the ones who need to lead by example and they are unable to do it. It affects the team through a trickle down process. If the good ones bail, then the others think they should to...after all, they aren't as fast as the ones who quit.

The Sunday workout is even worse during the season. The meets are on Saturday and they chase it with a hard workout. It makes sense to go hard on Saturday/Monday or Saturday/Tuesday, but not S/S/M or S/S/T. Sunday is needed for recovery.

The Austin track scene might not be like this, but I know Houston is. And not every private coach is bad. I get that and I even talk to one of them semi-frequently. I just have not had a lot of positive experiences with them, nor have any HS coaches that I know. It seems like the programs where it doesn't seem to be a problem are the programs where the head coach is just chillin' and looking to outsource some of the work. In other words, they don't really feel like they need to do any of the coaching as long as they get the kids to the meet.


@Aggietom
01/30/2011 11:37:32 PM
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There is a site (www.uiltexas.org/track-field/manual) where you can read the 2010 - 2011 NFHS rule book for the rules which outline contest rules and governs coach, spectator and student code of conduct. Some HS coaches are erroneously telling athletes that they can not train with club coaches when in fact UIL nor NFHS get in the business of telling parents where they can get personal trainers for their athletes. In fact the only rule that exist is for governing club recruiting so that it is not taking place during the HS track season. I am an official (certified by USATF and UIL in combined events), formerly club coach, and who occasionally gives personal training to select athletes who are looking for an edge over their peers in horizontal and vertical jumps. [quote=Texasrunner1965]Question for you guys...is there a UIL rule that after 2/5, your track athlete must train with his/her high school coach and is not allowed to be coached by a club coach? If the track athlete wants to run track for their high school track team, that is. Thanks for any help regarding this matter.[/quote] @Texasrunner1965
There is a site (www.uiltexas.org/track-field/manual) where you can read the 2010 - 2011 NFHS rule book for the rules which outline contest rules and governs coach, spectator and student code of conduct. Some HS coaches are erroneously telling athletes that they can not train with club coaches when in fact UIL nor NFHS get in the business of telling parents where they can get personal trainers for their athletes. In fact the only rule that exist is for governing club recruiting so that it is not taking place during the HS track season. I am an official (certified by USATF and UIL in combined events), formerly club coach, and who occasionally gives personal training to select athletes who are looking for an edge over their peers in horizontal and vertical jumps.

Texasrunner1965 wrote:
Question for you guys...is there a UIL rule that after 2/5, your track athlete must train with his/her high school coach and is not allowed to be coached by a club coach? If the track athlete wants to run track for their high school track team, that is.
Thanks for any help regarding this matter.


@Texasrunner1965
01/31/2011 10:58:15 AM
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@cfrench: You're talking to the wrong guy about certifications, college recruiting, etc. I'm Level II in jumps and will be getting more as the clinics come back through Texas/La. I work with the college coaches to let them know who is available...not only on my team, but others as well. I also think you think I'm talking about Blanks. I'm not. PM me if you want to know who. The main problem I have is that I have found that privately coached athletes are much more likely to be uncoachable. They show up saying they are hurt on key workout days or that they are tired because they "trained yesterday" (Sunday). Either that or they refuse to do certain technical suggestions. I'm not an idiot. I begin to notice patterns and when an athlete is always hurting on the days of certain workouts, but available to go to meets, then I put my foot down. I've never told an athlete they can't do outside training, but I do let them know that overtraining leads to injury and I'm not going to put overtrained athletes in the meets. The other thing I don't like is when private coach shows up and starts poking his head inside the team tent or coming out on to the field. This hasn't happened to me personally, but I've watched it happen to other teams. Tell me how a HS coach should take that. It is bizarre. I don't really see how you can fault me or any HS coach who puts this much time into their program for not being totally happy with the private influence. It hurts the team atmosphere in a number of ways. Then again, private coaches don't care about that.
@cfrench:

You're talking to the wrong guy about certifications, college recruiting, etc.

I'm Level II in jumps and will be getting more as the clinics come back through Texas/La.
I work with the college coaches to let them know who is available...not only on my team, but others as well.

I also think you think I'm talking about Blanks. I'm not. PM me if you want to know who.

The main problem I have is that I have found that privately coached athletes are much more likely to be uncoachable. They show up saying they are hurt on key workout days or that they are tired because they "trained yesterday" (Sunday). Either that or they refuse to do certain technical suggestions. I'm not an idiot. I begin to notice patterns and when an athlete is always hurting on the days of certain workouts, but available to go to meets, then I put my foot down.

I've never told an athlete they can't do outside training, but I do let them know that overtraining leads to injury and I'm not going to put overtrained athletes in the meets. The other thing I don't like is when private coach shows up and starts poking his head inside the team tent or coming out on to the field. This hasn't happened to me personally, but I've watched it happen to other teams. Tell me how a HS coach should take that. It is bizarre.

I don't really see how you can fault me or any HS coach who puts this much time into their program for not being totally happy with the private influence. It hurts the team atmosphere in a number of ways. Then again, private coaches don't care about that.
01/31/2011 12:26:29 PM
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I always tell my runners...."You wanna do your own thing, then go join your own team." Of course, this mainly applies during the in-season. When you join a team, you gotta take the good with the bad...that's part of being on a team. Unfortunately, not all runners have solid/good/great HS coaches, and they may feel that they need some extra help from a club coach. Well that's fine and dandy as long as that runner and the HS coach are on the same page. However, if a runner is part of a good/great team with a good/great coach, then you gotta follow/respect the wishes of the head coach...whatever that may be.
I always tell my runners...."You wanna do your own thing, then go join your own team." Of course, this mainly applies during the in-season.

When you join a team, you gotta take the good with the bad...that's part of being on a team. Unfortunately, not all runners have solid/good/great HS coaches, and they may feel that they need some extra help from a club coach. Well that's fine and dandy as long as that runner and the HS coach are on the same page. However, if a runner is part of a good/great team with a good/great coach, then you gotta follow/respect the wishes of the head coach...whatever that may be.

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