Poll: New jumps runway rule

Option Votes Score
I'm in favor!!! Yes!...finally...bout time...there truly is a benevolent track God! 6 60%
I'm not in favor.....I mean, how can my kid get their steps if they cant run the opposite direction on the runway at the meet? 4 40%
10 Votes

Vote!
New jumps runway rule
06/30/2019 9:14:10 AM
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NFHS Rule 6-2-6 has been amended. Athletes will no longer be able to run backwards or in the opposite direction in order to get their marks in the horizontal jumps, pole vault and javelin.
NFHS Rule 6-2-6 has been amended. Athletes will no longer be able to run backwards or in the opposite direction in order to get their marks in the horizontal jumps, pole vault and javelin.
06/30/2019 7:56:01 PM
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Running the opposite direction to get marks... Kind of like running in warm-ups to get marks, then taking the warm-ups off to compete, right?
Running the opposite direction to get marks... Kind of like running in warm-ups to get marks, then taking the warm-ups off to compete, right?
07/01/2019 7:40:08 PM
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I could see this as an issue in the first couple meets where schools without a long jump pit haven't had the opportunity to get marks yet. But, I guess that is what long school hallways are for. @CoachVersaw
I could see this as an issue in the first couple meets where schools without a long jump pit haven't had the opportunity to get marks yet.
But, I guess that is what long school hallways are for.
@CoachVersaw
07/01/2019 10:12:28 PM
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@bmitchem Brian, thanks for the note. Actually, I regularly wonder how long/triple/high jumpers ever find a mark. And I marvel that some actually do. This is going to get a little long... It seems to me there are a few important variables to steps on the long jump (to simplify things down to one event for a bit here). It's hard enough getting a repeatable mark as it is. Why would you add variables to it like going in the opposite direction (wind and pit visibility issues, minimally), like wearing warm-ups that you won't be wearing in competition while you're finding the mark, and so on? Then I think about the difference between practice day and meet day. As an illustration, I became the place kicker for our football team my senior year of high school. In practice and warm-ups, I could kick the ball off down to about the 15-yard-line. Then, come opening kickoff for our first game, suddenly I kicked the ball down to about the five-yard-line. The difference wasn't always that pronounced, but I kicked consistently deeper in games than in practices. It occurs to me some of that adrenaline rush kind of business has to apply to the long jump as well. How do you control that?? Like a lot of other people, I tried the long jump in high school. I wasn't terrible at it, but it just wasn't worth all the magic of learning how to find the board without going over it. I got a little better at hitting the board but never a lot better. And so I became more exclusively a distance runner... That way, many of my best efforts weren't wiped out by being four inches over the edge of a board. It occurs to me that there might be a select few people out there who are gifted at consistently finding the board. The rest of us probably might as well just skip the event. We likely don't have the mind-body connection required. I see lots of people trying the event and doing things (see three paragraphs up) that seem intuitively obvious not to do. Maybe if you have that connection, many of these "intuitively obvious" things don't matter? I don't know. I'd be interested in the perspective of some long jump coaches on this issue. Am I right that the event takes a kind of mind-body coordination that is simply lost on a large number of us? I will say I had essentially no track coaching at all in high school. Men who didn't really want the job were told to be there and probably paid not very much. They showed up, they went home, and they didn't give much instruction in between. So, maybe all I missed out on was having a coach, but I kind of think there might have been more to it than that.
@bmitchem

Brian, thanks for the note. Actually, I regularly wonder how long/triple/high jumpers ever find a mark. And I marvel that some actually do. This is going to get a little long...

It seems to me there are a few important variables to steps on the long jump (to simplify things down to one event for a bit here). It's hard enough getting a repeatable mark as it is. Why would you add variables to it like going in the opposite direction (wind and pit visibility issues, minimally), like wearing warm-ups that you won't be wearing in competition while you're finding the mark, and so on?

Then I think about the difference between practice day and meet day. As an illustration, I became the place kicker for our football team my senior year of high school. In practice and warm-ups, I could kick the ball off down to about the 15-yard-line. Then, come opening kickoff for our first game, suddenly I kicked the ball down to about the five-yard-line. The difference wasn't always that pronounced, but I kicked consistently deeper in games than in practices. It occurs to me some of that adrenaline rush kind of business has to apply to the long jump as well. How do you control that??

Like a lot of other people, I tried the long jump in high school. I wasn't terrible at it, but it just wasn't worth all the magic of learning how to find the board without going over it. I got a little better at hitting the board but never a lot better. And so I became more exclusively a distance runner...

That way, many of my best efforts weren't wiped out by being four inches over the edge of a board.

It occurs to me that there might be a select few people out there who are gifted at consistently finding the board. The rest of us probably might as well just skip the event. We likely don't have the mind-body connection required. I see lots of people trying the event and doing things (see three paragraphs up) that seem intuitively obvious not to do. Maybe if you have that connection, many of these "intuitively obvious" things don't matter?

I don't know. I'd be interested in the perspective of some long jump coaches on this issue. Am I right that the event takes a kind of mind-body coordination that is simply lost on a large number of us?

I will say I had essentially no track coaching at all in high school. Men who didn't really want the job were told to be there and probably paid not very much. They showed up, they went home, and they didn't give much instruction in between. So, maybe all I missed out on was having a coach, but I kind of think there might have been more to it than that.
07/02/2019 9:15:56 AM
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@CoachVersaw I know where you are coming from. I triple jumped my senior year (along with running mid/long). Zero coaching. I think this is where the biggest issue will be for many kids (note: I happen to like this rule, but see early season issues). Long jump is one of those events where kids with limited athletic ability can still compete without seeing the competition run by them week after week. Many kids get little if any specialized coaching during the week, so things like runway marks are what you do on Saturdays when you get to the meet (especially if you don't have a pit of your own). We use the backward run at practice the 1st time kids are ready for full jumps just to get a starting point. From there they do normal run throughs and we adjust the start mark. Then grab a tape measure. Easy to do in a hallway as well. Even then, you are making in-meet adjustments. However, you still have to have a coach that cares / knows enough to put a little bit of effort into it.
@CoachVersaw
I know where you are coming from. I triple jumped my senior year (along with running mid/long). Zero coaching. I think this is where the biggest issue will be for many kids (note: I happen to like this rule, but see early season issues). Long jump is one of those events where kids with limited athletic ability can still compete without seeing the competition run by them week after week. Many kids get little if any specialized coaching during the week, so things like runway marks are what you do on Saturdays when you get to the meet (especially if you don't have a pit of your own). We use the backward run at practice the 1st time kids are ready for full jumps just to get a starting point. From there they do normal run throughs and we adjust the start mark. Then grab a tape measure. Easy to do in a hallway as well. Even then, you are making in-meet adjustments. However, you still have to have a coach that cares / knows enough to put a little bit of effort into it.
07/04/2019 10:41:29 PM
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Joined: Jan 2015
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My perspective as a jumps coach is that athletes should never run backwards from a board to get a mark. The coaching process I use in jumps instruction never involves a backwards run in order to acquire any mark even a preliminary one early in the season, even during indoor season where we may not have access to a pit. I dont even use a runway when teaching the approach and getting a preliminary mark. The board innately early on causes athletes to focus on it. So when teaching the approach and getting a mark we do it in a random lane on the track. I build consistency in straight line sprinting and teaching the proper approach and acceleration patterns and then we move to the real runway once those patterns have been established in the athlete. From there we are heading downrange on the runway never backwards and I have found that adjustments are easier to make and mistakes in the approach by the athletes easier to see and address. The way I learned to teach it is that backwards runs are never used or acceptable. Even in a young athlete, maybe a jv kids who I may have been crunched for time with during the week and not been able to get a approach set before a jv meet. At the meet I'm not having them run backwards up a runway. I find a open lane and with 2-3 straight line runs I can establish a mark that is easily transferred to the runway. Like someone mentioned with wind direction coming into play why in the world would I have a kid run in the opposite direction, makes no sense. You dont need to run backwards to get a mark and shouldn't and we haven't even talked about the safety issues and waste of time when we could be starting the event sooner instead of waiting for a ton of kids to do 2-3 backwards runs and then 2-3 more forward at minimum.
My perspective as a jumps coach is that athletes should never run backwards from a board to get a mark. The coaching process I use in jumps instruction never involves a backwards run in order to acquire any mark even a preliminary one early in the season, even during indoor season where we may not have access to a pit. I dont even use a runway when teaching the approach and getting a preliminary mark. The board innately early on causes athletes to focus on it. So when teaching the approach and getting a mark we do it in a random lane on the track. I build consistency in straight line sprinting and teaching the proper approach and acceleration patterns and then we move to the real runway once those patterns have been established in the athlete. From there we are heading downrange on the runway never backwards and I have found that adjustments are easier to make and mistakes in the approach by the athletes easier to see and address. The way I learned to teach it is that backwards runs are never used or acceptable. Even in a young athlete, maybe a jv kids who I may have been crunched for time with during the week and not been able to get a approach set before a jv meet. At the meet I'm not having them run backwards up a runway. I find a open lane and with 2-3 straight line runs I can establish a mark that is easily transferred to the runway. Like someone mentioned with wind direction coming into play why in the world would I have a kid run in the opposite direction, makes no sense. You dont need to run backwards to get a mark and shouldn't and we haven't even talked about the safety issues and waste of time when we could be starting the event sooner instead of waiting for a ton of kids to do 2-3 backwards runs and then 2-3 more forward at minimum.
07/08/2019 4:18:08 PM
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[quote=CoachVersaw]@bmitchem Then I think about the difference between practice day and meet day. As an illustration, I became the place kicker for our football team my senior year of high school. In practice and warm-ups, I could kick the ball off down to about the 15-yard-line. Then, come opening kickoff for our first game, suddenly I kicked the ball down to about the five-yard-line. The difference wasn't always that pronounced, but I kicked consistently deeper in games than in practices. It occurs to me some of that adrenaline rush kind of business has to apply to the long jump as well. How do you control that??[/quote] That's exactly why runbacks on meet day are essential. You can not do a measurement from a different day at practice and then expect the mark to be the same on meet day. Runbacks have to happen on the actual day and time of event as the environment is different and so is the athlete's performance. If you just go off a pre-determined measurement, then you spend the next couple jumps adjusting and trying to mark. Not having runbacks will affect the competition.
CoachVersaw wrote:
@bmitchem
Then I think about the difference between practice day and meet day. As an illustration, I became the place kicker for our football team my senior year of high school. In practice and warm-ups, I could kick the ball off down to about the 15-yard-line. Then, come opening kickoff for our first game, suddenly I kicked the ball down to about the five-yard-line. The difference wasn't always that pronounced, but I kicked consistently deeper in games than in practices. It occurs to me some of that adrenaline rush kind of business has to apply to the long jump as well. How do you control that??


That's exactly why runbacks on meet day are essential. You can not do a measurement from a different day at practice and then expect the mark to be the same on meet day. Runbacks have to happen on the actual day and time of event as the environment is different and so is the athlete's performance. If you just go off a pre-determined measurement, then you spend the next couple jumps adjusting and trying to mark.
Not having runbacks will affect the competition.
07/08/2019 4:40:09 PM
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@MT28 Actually, you need to have a regular measurement so that you have one consistent starting point for run throughs at the meet. Depending on weather / how warm the athletes are, etc. you can adjust what will be their competition mark up / back accordingly (and yes, that will move some too as conditions change. In practice, it is the same thing. 1 consistent mark to work off of. If you find that each week, you keep moving up / back the same amount, then let that new point be the normal starting point.
@MT28
Actually, you need to have a regular measurement so that you have one consistent starting point for run throughs at the meet. Depending on weather / how warm the athletes are, etc. you can adjust what will be their competition mark up / back accordingly (and yes, that will move some too as conditions change. In practice, it is the same thing. 1 consistent mark to work off of.
If you find that each week, you keep moving up / back the same amount, then let that new point be the normal starting point.
07/09/2019 10:25:43 AM
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@bmitchem I agree you need a regular measurement. @MT28 runbacks are not essential and shouldn't be used. If you teach the approach correctly and make the proper adjustments during run throughs the jumper should be good to go. Sometimes with certain athletes I've used a coaches checkmark to gauge if the athlete is performing the approach phases properly. Most issues with athletes not on the board or "All over the dance floor" as I call it are problems with the approach. This is the same with high jumpers. I spend the majority of the learning phase addressing the approach because that is where most problems are and that is what affects jumps. Once you leave the ground you cant change anything about the jump in the air the parabola flight path is predetermined by physics so in order to affect the jump you must have a good approach.
@bmitchem I agree you need a regular measurement. @MT28 runbacks are not essential and shouldn't be used. If you teach the approach correctly and make the proper adjustments during run throughs the jumper should be good to go. Sometimes with certain athletes I've used a coaches checkmark to gauge if the athlete is performing the approach phases properly. Most issues with athletes not on the board or "All over the dance floor" as I call it are problems with the approach. This is the same with high jumpers. I spend the majority of the learning phase addressing the approach because that is where most problems are and that is what affects jumps. Once you leave the ground you cant change anything about the jump in the air the parabola flight path is predetermined by physics so in order to affect the jump you must have a good approach.
07/10/2019 12:06:03 PM
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@cuethecoach "All over the dance floor." That pretty well summarizes my high school long jump experience. :-)
@cuethecoach

"All over the dance floor."

That pretty well summarizes my high school long jump experience.
08/17/2019 7:55:32 PM
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@bmitchem @MT28 @CoachVersaw 4 1st time middle school jumpers this morning. 11/12 jumps on board 1 foul. Built their approaches yesterday. No runbacks at practice or the meet. If it can be done with the middle school "cat herd" (Yes middle school meets are truly like rustling a cat herd) it can be done at the high school level. [url=https://photos.app.goo.gl/o4kZ9HauTBB4wnvk7] 2 good board placements...[/url]
@bmitchem @MT28 @CoachVersaw 4 1st time middle school jumpers this morning. 11/12 jumps on board 1 foul. Built their approaches yesterday. No runbacks at practice or the meet. If it can be done with the middle school "cat herd" (Yes middle school meets are truly like rustling a cat herd) it can be done at the high school level.

2 good board placements...
02/25/2020 2:14:48 PM
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Just a reminder to jumps coaches. Know the new rules! Don't let your kids be hurt because you didn't know. NFHS Rule 6-2-6 has been amended. Athletes will no longer be able to run backward or in the opposite direction in order to get their marks in the horizontal jumps, pole vault and javelin.
Just a reminder to jumps coaches. Know the new rules! Don't let your kids be hurt because you didn't know.
NFHS Rule 6-2-6 has been amended. Athletes will no longer be able to run backward or in the opposite direction in order to get their marks in the horizontal jumps, pole vault and javelin.
04/01/2020 7:29:34 PM
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I absolutely hate when jumpers/vaulters do run backs at meets. Coaches it's down right unprofessional to have athletes doing run backs at meets. Can you imagine a jumper doing a run back in a college meet or the Olympics? We've all been to high school meets (too many) where the pole vault or long jump/triple jump is still going long after everything else is done. Doing run backs slows down the warm-up or denies other athletes (that came prepared) the time to take an extra warm-up jump or two before the competition starts. The NFHS made the right call adding this rule to the book. It's super easy to lay out a tape measure on the track, runway, or even a sidewalk if that's all you've got, and spend 30 minutes having your athletes get their competition steps down a day or two before the first meet. I've even done this in a hallway during the indoor season and on the track with pole vaulters before we got a pole vault pit at our school. You don't even really need a coach to do it, the kids can do it on their own with minimal supervision. Yes things change on meet days (like wind) and you will have to make some adjustments but their steps should be close enough to get an athlete within a foot or so of the board on their first full warm-up run at a meet and they can make adjustments from there. As far as getting consistency in jumpers approaches, it starts with the first two strides. The vast amount of variance in stride length occurs in the first couple of strides, so get those consistent and you'll be surprised how consistent the rest of their run is. Elite jumpers will have marks for their first 4 steps, but I think two is plenty for most high schoolers. I have athletes put marks down on the runway for them to hit with their first two steps, even at meets if they need it early on. I prefer two big bounds for starting jump and pole vault approaches. Two big bounds hitting the same two spots every time really makes a jumper's approach consistent. Jumpers that take a bunch of little steps to start their approach usually have a heck of a time getting their takeoff consistent IMO. Once you get some consistency with the first couple of strides, then you can start using a mid-mark to help fine tune an athlete's approach at meets. I see a handful of athletes and coaches in Colorado using a shoe or some other handy object to mark a mid-mark on the runway during warm-up jumps and that works really well. Again if you spend a few minutes teaching your jumpers this stuff they can do it on their own at meets, no run-back necessary.
I absolutely hate when jumpers/vaulters do run backs at meets. Coaches it's down right unprofessional to have athletes doing run backs at meets. Can you imagine a jumper doing a run back in a college meet or the Olympics? We've all been to high school meets (too many) where the pole vault or long jump/triple jump is still going long after everything else is done. Doing run backs slows down the warm-up or denies other athletes (that came prepared) the time to take an extra warm-up jump or two before the competition starts. The NFHS made the right call adding this rule to the book.

It's super easy to lay out a tape measure on the track, runway, or even a sidewalk if that's all you've got, and spend 30 minutes having your athletes get their competition steps down a day or two before the first meet. I've even done this in a hallway during the indoor season and on the track with pole vaulters before we got a pole vault pit at our school. You don't even really need a coach to do it, the kids can do it on their own with minimal supervision. Yes things change on meet days (like wind) and you will have to make some adjustments but their steps should be close enough to get an athlete within a foot or so of the board on their first full warm-up run at a meet and they can make adjustments from there.

As far as getting consistency in jumpers approaches, it starts with the first two strides. The vast amount of variance in stride length occurs in the first couple of strides, so get those consistent and you'll be surprised how consistent the rest of their run is. Elite jumpers will have marks for their first 4 steps, but I think two is plenty for most high schoolers. I have athletes put marks down on the runway for them to hit with their first two steps, even at meets if they need it early on. I prefer two big bounds for starting jump and pole vault approaches. Two big bounds hitting the same two spots every time really makes a jumper's approach consistent. Jumpers that take a bunch of little steps to start their approach usually have a heck of a time getting their takeoff consistent IMO. Once you get some consistency with the first couple of strides, then you can start using a mid-mark to help fine tune an athlete's approach at meets. I see a handful of athletes and coaches in Colorado using a shoe or some other handy object to mark a mid-mark on the runway during warm-up jumps and that works really well. Again if you spend a few minutes teaching your jumpers this stuff they can do it on their own at meets, no run-back necessary.
07/02/2020 8:41:55 AM
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[quote=cuethecoach]NFHS Rule 6-2-6 has been amended. Athletes will no longer be [url=https://bestessayservices.org/about-the-author/]About[/url] to run backwards or in the opposite direction in order to get their marks in the horizontal jumps, pole vault and javelin.[/quote] it's like something about effectiveness of warm-ups period, right?
cuethecoach wrote:
NFHS Rule 6-2-6 has been amended. Athletes will no longer be About to run backwards or in the opposite direction in order to get their marks in the horizontal jumps, pole vault and javelin.

it's like something about effectiveness of warm-ups period, right?

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