Dear Running: Conventional Or Not, I'm Happy With My Career


Moe Abusway is a graduate of Strongsville High School in Strongsville, Ohio. The future Columbia University hurdler shares his thoughts as his high school career rounds to a close, and reflects on what the sport has meant to him over the last four years. 


"Nothing can ever compare to the rush I've felt when getting into competition. No sprained ankles, no broken elbows, no season ending clavicle fractures could stop me from loving you." -- Moe Abusway

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Dear Running,

Without you, I don't know if I would be the person I am today. 

Some people might think I'm crazy for still having appreciation for you, after all you've put me through, but it has only made me a better person. Everything you encompass is priceless and I wish for everyone to experience the kind of happiness and feeling you bring me. Being one of the fastest hurdlers in Ohio over the past two seasons has been both a blessing and a curse, but what a wonderful journey it has been, and will continue to be.

I'll remember the bus rides. They were important, because it was there where I would envision success. It was a place where I could put my headphones in, close my eyes and picture myself crossing the finish line in first place. Sometimes it would seem so clear, so real, that I would even tear up. I knew everything I worked for during the season was for a feeling like that.


The finish to my high school running career was quite unconventional. It didn't end with a state championship title. It didn't end with a new school record. It didn't end with the opportunity to finish out with the greatest team a person could wish to compete for. But what it did end with was teammates who became lifelong friends. It ended with coaches who treated me like I was their son.
 

Competing in the state track meet as a sophomore was one of the greatest experiences I've ever had. All those people in the crowd. Lining up next to the top guys in the state. I was over the moon with excitement. I can honestly say that no athletic feeling in my life, so far, has lived up to that moment at the state meet. 

After that, I knew I had two more years to experience it; or so I thought. After the broken collarbone my junior year I thought, 'OK, this sucks, but let's get after it next season.'

And I did. I owned the either the No. 1 or No. 2 spot in the state all season, and was on a mission to make my "bus vision" come true. Coming into the postseason, I was in the best form of my life. I surprised myself every time I ran, doing more than I thought I was possibly capable of.

And then came the second, and third, break.

Another broken collarbone--but this time, a broken spirit and mindset as well.

So in the end, after four years on the track as a high school athlete, I have given a lot to you. But I wouldn't change a thing. I can confidently say I have never wavered from my effort and utter dedication toward you. The sacrifices and time spent were not without return. You taught me discipline, patience, and gave me a taste of success. Nothing can take that away. Nothing can ever compare to the rush I've felt when getting into competition. No sprained ankles, no broken elbows, no season ending clavicle fractures could stop me from loving you.

The finish to my high school running career was quite unconventional. 

It didn't end with a state championship title. It didn't end with a new school record. It didn't end with the opportunity to finish out with the greatest team a person could wish to compete for. 

But what it did end with was teammates who became lifelong friends. It ended with coaches who treated me like I was their son. 

It ended with more success, love, and support than I could possibly ask for. My high school track career did end. And whether it was conventional or not, I wouldn't have had it any other way. I made it to the finish in one piece. 

Running, thank you for everything you have given to me and every single lesson you have taught me along the way. Here's to four more years together in New York City.


With love,





Moe Abusway

Strongsville, '19


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